COURTSY OF VISION SPRING INITIATIVE LAGOS


 

International Sex Worker Rights Day.(03/03/2019)

 3rd of March is International Sex Workers Right Day, which is being celebrated around the world by groups and individuals who seek to recognize and defend the rights of sex workers.

So many researches has demonstrated that the criminalization of sex work is associated with violence against sex workers, decreased access to health care, barriers to reporting human rights abuses, and dis-empowerment in condom negotiation (whether a sex worker’s wishes regarding condom use are respected). Which all  this contributes to the high rate of HIV infection in our country. Governments should recognize and address the relationship between laws criminalizing sex work and the human rights violations that result from these laws.

We see the affirmation and defense of the rights of sex workers as an integral part of our work to affirm sexual freedom as a fundamental human right. 
International Sex Workers Rights Day isn’t just about securing the rights of sex workers; it’s about securing human rights.”

#Sexworkersrightarehumanright
#loveabovehate
#humanrightisforall
#GWIHR
#Wearetoostrongtobecaged

Zero Discrimination Day.(1/3/2019)

The UN first celebrated Zero Discrimination Day on March 1, 2014, after UNAIDS, a UN program on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), launched its Zero Discrimination Campaign on World AIDS Day in December 2013.

 

Today is Zero discrimination day, GWIHR is joining UN and other international organizations to celebrate this day.

As a community based organization, sex workers and other vulnerable women and girls are faced with discrimination every day because of which they are, especially those women/girls who are living with HIV/AIDS and those that are affected -with HIV. Certain institutions, medical centers, social media etc, discriminate these vulnerable populations which have led to stigma and discrimination and it is still a problem in the society.

The Theme of this year Zero Discrimination Day is “ACT TO CHANGE LAWS THAT DISCRIMINATE” 

This day is speaking about Human right violations that are happening all over the world especially the women because of discriminating laws and practices.  We believe that laws must protect and not cause harm.

UNAIDS is highlighting the urgent need to take actions against discriminatory laws; 

GWIHR aims to promote equality before law and it’s practice by sensitizing the community we live in, law enforcers, our leaders and competent stakeholders in the society on the laws that Discriminate women…….

 

PrEP-FACTS ABOUT PrEP

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at very high risk for HIV take HIV medicines daily to lower their chances of getting infected. PrEP can stop HIV from taking hold and spreading throughout your body. It is highly effective for preventing HIV if used as prescribed, but it is much less effective when not taken consistently.

Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%. Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms and other prevention methods.
Should I stop using condom when am on PrEP??
No, you should not stop using condoms because you are taking PrEP. PrEP doesn’t give you any protection against other STDs, like gonorrhea, syphilis, Chlamydia and does not prevent pregnancy Also, while PrEP can significantly reduce your risk of HIV infection if taken daily, you can combine additional strategies like condom use with PrEP to reduce your risk even further.
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WHERE YOU CAN GET PrEP PLEASE VISIT OUR OFFICE AT
7, EDMAC AVENUE EAST –WEST ROAD OPPSITE MERCY LAND JUNCTION PORT HARCOURT
OR CALL 08142143758, 08082432446
OR EMAIL US AT greaterwomeninitiative@gmail.com

PEP-Have you heard about PEP?

POST-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS
Sometimes, in the heat of the moment you may forget to play safely, or you were raped
This is when it’s important to consider getting post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), a course of treatment for guys who think they may have been put at risk of HIV infection.

HOW DOES PEP WORK?
PEP involves a 4-week course of HIV treatment that helps prevent someone from HIV infection.
PEP works by stopping the virus from replicating after recent exposure. The cells originally infected with HIV die naturally within a short period of time, reducing the likelihood for HIV to establish itself in the body.

WHO IS PEP FOR?
PEP is for anyone who thinks they may have been exposed to HIV. Some of the most common reasons for needing PEP medication include:
Having condom less virginal/anal sex or if the condom breaks/slips off during sex with someone who has or may have HIV Sharing needles or syringes with a person who has or may have HIV

WHEN SHOULD I TAKE PEP?
If you believe you’ve been exposed to HIV, you should start PEP as soon as possible, ideally within a few hours after the risk event. If it is not started within 72 hours (3 days) of exposure to HIV it is likely that the drug will be ineffective.
WHAT IF I TEST POSITIVE AFTER PEP?
If you test positive for HIV, it’s recommended you start treatment right away. The numerous treatment methods now available have made HIV a very manageable condition by suppressing the virus to an undetectable viral load.
WHERE CAN I GET PEP?
Visit our office today
Contact us
Monday – Friday
For questions regarding HIV call the HIV Hotline 08142143758,08082432446
For more info about PEP and to find locations to access PEP in your area.
Send us an Email greaterwomeninitiative@gmail.com

FACTS ABOUT STI

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) affect people of all ages, backgrounds, and from all walks of life. Most STIs are curable, and the rest are manageable with good treatment and care. Finding out that you have an STI is scary, and some STI’s can cause serious health problems—but if you have all the facts about STIs/STDs you can get it sorted. STI’s are passed from one person to another during sexual contact. STI’s can be passed without ‘having sex’, through intimate bodily rubbing and shared bodily fluids. STI’s often cause obvious symptoms which alert you that you may have an infection; however, many people with STI’s have no signs or symptoms so are unaware they are infectious. STI’s can infect many areas of the body—the genital and anal area, mouth and throat. STI’s are caused by microscopic (invisible) organisms such as bacteria, viruses or parasites. More than half of us will contract an STI at some point in our lives.
How is STI’s spread?
STI’s are usually spread through sex—vaginal, oral or anal. STI’s can be spread through any type of sex: from a male to a female, a female to a male, a male to another male or a female to another female. Some STI’s can be spread through any contact between the penis, vagina, mouth or anus—even if there is no penetration. For example, genital herpes is transmitted through direct skin-to-skin contact, and can be transmitted even if there is no penetration. Some STI’s can be spread in other ways also. For example, HIV and Hepatitis B are spread through sharing needles for injecting drugs or medicines

Announcement! Announcement!!

THIS IS TO INFORM ALL THE SEX WORKERS IN RIVERS STATE THAT GWIHR WILL START THEIR FIRST LITERACY PROGRAM FOR ALL THE COMMUNITY MEMBERS ON THE 7TH JULY 2017.
AND ITS ALL OPEN TO ALL THE COMMUNITY MEMBERS WHOM CAN’T READ AND WRITE.
VENUE
NO.7 EDMAC AVENUE EAST WEST ROAD,PORT HARCOURT RIVERS STATE.
TIME
10AM-12 NOON
DAYS:EVERY FRIDAY
COME AND YOU WILL NEVER REGRET BEING THERE…
THANKS MANAGEMENT